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Here you will find examples of my hand crafted lampwork beads. Each glass bead is an individual creation based on a theme or a design that catches my imagination. Inspiration may come from the beach, my garden, or the newest issue of National Geographic. I also tried to provide interesting and useful links to other sites featuring various glass artists, organizations or resources. Beads for sale can be found in the shopping area of my site. Store

I live and have my art glass studio in Isla Vista, California, a diverse community overlooking the Pacific Ocean next to the University of California, Santa Barbara. I had my introduction to the art of glass beadmaking in 2000 at a class offered by Santa Barbara Adult Education. Right from the start I loved the concept of working with hot glass in a rainbow of colors to create my own beads. But what I ended up with was usually a dark/muddy brown glass bead with only a glimmer of the original color spectrum! We were missing basic tools like the kilns necessary to anneal the beads so most of mine cracked by the end of the class or after a couple of days at home. The book "Beads of Glass, The Art and the Artists" by Cindy Jenkins, and a video tape on lampworking, fueled my determination to find the glass artists whose work I admired so much and work with them in person. On this site you can find examples of my own lampwork beads, some fused glass and finished jewelry as well as some items from my collection that I have built while working with various glass artists. I consider myself fortunate to have had opportunities to study with masters such as:

James Smircich
www.smircich.com

Kate Fowle

Meleney
www.katefowle.com

Pati Walton
www.patiwalton.com

Leah Fairbanks
www.leahfairbanks.com

Ofilia Cinta
www.ofiliaartglass.com

Andrea Guarino
www.andreaguarino.com

Michael Barley
www.barleybeads.com

Loren Stump
www.stumpchuck.com

Don McKinney
www.glasspalette.com and most

recently Doug Remschneider www.remschneiderglass.com
where I got my first formal training working in Borosilicate glass. When I started I didn't realize the importance or evening the meaning of terms like borosilicate, Bullseye, Murano, dichroic, Murrini or that making a glass marble was so much different than working on a mandrel to make a lampwork bead. I also had to learn about the different styles of torches, the different types of flameworking, and the properties of the parts of a flame. I think that you will be able to see the influence of each of these amazing glass artists in my own work. Each time that I am at my torch I am filled with gratitude for finding a way of personal creative expression through the medium of hot glass. I am honored to be one of the lampwork artists that Connie Fox (www.conniefox.com) has chosen to represent on her website and in her classes. My hope is that the special beauty of lampwork beads help spark your own personal creative muse and inspire you to create something beautifully and uniquely your own! Lampwork beads can be used in jewelry design to create jewelry of just about all types including necklaces, pendants, and bracelets. I have purchased many beads from my friends and colleagues because I treasure them simply as works of art.